How long is the song Freebird

  • 04.01.2011, 7:47 p.m. Degree of difficulty of Free Bird Solo (Lynyrd Skynyrd) # 1

    Difficulty level of the Free Bird Solo (Lynyrd Skynyrd)

    I am currently learning the Free Bird Solo and wonder where the level of difficulty could be classified.
    I'm still at the very beginning of my "solo career". The only thing I've managed so far is Johnny B. Goode, otherwise I can't do solos. I can play the first three licks in this solo at original speed, after 2 hours practice.

    For all of you who don't know this monumental, unearthly and incredibly horny solo, here is the link:
    The solo starts at 4:57, but it's worth listening to the whole song!
    I can play until 5:17, so I'll probably do the rest too, right?

    http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x3w...w-lyrics_music


  • 04.01.2011, 7:54 pm Degree of difficulty of Free Bird Solo (Lynyrd Skynyrd) # 2

    The problem is that you should know what you are doing, so from the theory. In terms of difficulty, it is to be classified as very high because it is very long and therefore confusing, and technically not without it. I would advise you to first deal with pentatonic scales, for example, in order to understand what the guy is playing. Because there is not just one version of the song, that is, he just keeps using phrases that he brings in, the rest is totally freely improvised.

    That means, if you understand what he is doing and you are technically up to date then you can simply improvise without having to memorize the whole solo and adapt it to the mood of the song so that it sounds good
    But when you've got this far, just keep playing, sometimes you can use certain things that you can use again later

    In terms of difficulty, the solo at the beginning of Journey to the Center of Mind by the Amboy Dukes would be similar (I did that to myself in my youthful recklessness )

  • 04.01.2011, 20:17 Degree of difficulty of Free Bird Solo (Lynyrd Skynyrd) # 3

    I have understood the theory behind it, but I do not master the fingerings of the pentatonic scale.
    But I know that every fingering has its keynote at a certain point and according to this keynote you can play the fingering to the right tone.

    The playing techniques that were used in the song, I have more or less mastered all of them. Bending, hammering, tapping ... anything else? I just have to learn to use them so that they sound good. That means: I know how every single technique works, now I "only" have to apply it to the solo.

    But you don't need a lot of solo experience to get it done?


  • 04.01.2011, 21:26 Degree of difficulty of Free Bird Solo (Lynyrd Skynyrd) # 4

    Experience is always good. If you can do that much technique, it is a good start to deal with the Penta. At first it is completely unimportant to know anything about the basic tones etc.
    You have your 'fingerings' (also patterns), they are the same for every key, only they are somewhere else. That means you learn Emoll or Amoll once and can automatically reach any other key by shifting it ... in rock it is also so that often only one key is used per line, which simplifies everything.
    And this penta is your basic material for improvising and soloing. It takes a lot of work, you have to practice a lot, but you can do it better bit by bit, you can't learn phrasing, there are people who can help you, but you have to find out your way of playing yourself and then you can easily improvise over it for 5 minutes

    Otherwise you don't really need any experience if you re-enact something, but re-enacting something gives you experience again

  • 04.01.2011, 23:23 Degree of difficulty of Free Bird Solo (Lynyrd Skynyrd) # 5

    Technique is one thing ... what you can't really learn is phrasing ... the way you articulate sounds. You have to feel that ..... either you have it or you will never have it. And classics like the freebird solo (that of Allen Collins at least) may seem a bit easier technically compared to today's ultra-high-speed solo orgies, but they can turn into real challenges. I think Allen's solo is hard work (especially for beginners).

    If I were you, I would be more concerned with the music than with degrees of difficulty .... either you hear the sun rise with this piece and live the tones inside, or you want to paint by numbers .... then there are FreeBird and some other classic RocknRoll numbers are not your building site.


  • 04.01.2011, 23:51 Degree of difficulty of Free Bird Solo (Lynyrd Skynyrd) # 6

    Oh man and I had The Trashmen with their Bird song in my head the whole time and just thought to myself, what are they talking about ... : tongue:

  • 05.01.2011, 00:10 Degree of difficulty of the Free Bird Solo (Lynyrd Skynyrd) # 7


  • 05.01.2011, 00:15 Degree of difficulty of Free Bird Solo (Lynyrd Skynyrd) # 8

    Jo, sometimes it is helpful to go to the link directly
    But since I often know exactly which song I'm talking about, I like to save myself the Link click me game .... just had the wrong song in my head ... by the way, I think the Trashmen Bird song is awesome, I can laugh every time it works ... the arrangement just amuses me ...

  • 05.01.2011, 00:16 Degree of difficulty of Free Bird Solo (Lynyrd Skynyrd) # 9

    I'll check out this Trashmen Bird song right now


    EDIT -----

    Do you mean this one: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZThquH5t0ow (it's hardcore )

  • 05.01.2011, 00:21 Level of difficulty of Free Bird Solo (Lynyrd Skynyrd) # 10

    Yep

  • 05.01.2011, 10:11 Level of difficulty of Free Bird Solo (Lynyrd Skynyrd) # 11

    The Bird song doesn't have a solo



    Technique is one thing ... what you can't really learn is phrasing ... the way you articulate sounds. You have to feel that ..... either you have it or you will never have it. And classics like the freebird solo (that of Allen Collins at least) may seem a bit easier technically compared to today's ultra-high-speed solo orgies, but they can turn into real challenges. I think Allen's solo is hard work (especially for beginners).
    I would not put it quite like this, you can learn to have fun up to a certain point, but you have to deal with it, also with the theory of harmony and the pentas are a good start

  • 05.01.2011, 14:30 Degree of difficulty of Free Bird Solo (Lynyrd Skynyrd) # 12

    Quote by ULN78 ',' index.php? Page = Thread & postID = 471063 # post47 1063

    I think Allen's solo is hard work (especially for beginners).

    If I were you, I would be more concerned with the music than with the degrees of difficulty .... either you hear the sun rise with this piece and live the tones inside, or you want to paint by numbers ....

    I also think it's tough work. Definitely!

    At the solo feel I even get the sun up. Every time I hear it I can't get the grin off my face and can't sit still. Since I first heard it, I've been obsessed with the melody. I know the song from Forrest Gump (at the point where his girlfriend Jenny wants to throw herself off the balcony in a drug intoxication), I turned the film off and immediately had to know what the song is called and who it is from. For months the melody has been going through my head several times a day. I think there is a feeling of re-enactment.

  • 05.01.2011, 14:34 Degree of difficulty of Free Bird Solo (Lynyrd Skynyrd) # 13

    I think it's a terrific song (also heard for the first time with Forrest, but then pushed aside and rediscovered on a cassette by my old man ) since then I've been listening to it every now and then when I'm in the mood

  • 05.01.2011, 18:29 Degree of difficulty of Free Bird Solo (Lynyrd Skynyrd) # 14

    I just found the scene on Youtube and noticed that the solo was pretty badly chopped up and cut back together to adapt it to the mood of the action.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xsqDa...eature=related

    It sounds good there, but the entire solo sounds much livelier and livelier.
    So ... I keep practicing now. The tip of the middle finger will soon be muddy, but pain is generally overrated!