What are some causes of sensory overload

Sensory integration therapy

Sensory integration therapy

Sensory integration - a definition

The recording, processing and networking of sensory impressions: touch / feel, movement perception, balance perception, smell, taste, hearing, sight.
This process begins in the womb and is of crucial importance for all further development.
The interaction of the senses causes muscle tone, posture, movement and automated and targeted ability to act.
This is the prerequisite for the development of attention, endurance, concentration, emotional stability, the ability to relate, the ability to experience ...
"Self-esteem, self-control and self-confidence develop in the awareness that the body exists as a reliable sensorimotor structure and stem from a good integration of the nervous system." (Jean Ayres)

 

Possible symptoms

If the perception, processing and networking is disturbed, this can show up, for example, in the following abnormalities:

  • Clumsiness in gross and fine motor skills, e.g. frequent stumbling, "bothering", problems with painting and writing ...
  • Reluctance to move / fear of movement, does not crawl ...
  • Hypersensitivity or under-sensitivity to touch, movement, noises, defense against physical contact ...
  • Hyperactivity, daydreaming, poor risk assessment ...
  • Speech delays, hearing problems, fears
  • Child develops little independence, e.g. when dressing and undressing ...
  • Child is monitored and not getting tired, sleep disorders, "screaming children"
  • Wetting, defecating, eating problems, drinking problems
  • easy distraction, forgetfulness, sensitivity to criticism, lack of perseverance ...
  • acting spontaneously without thinking; angry quickly, aggressive, listless ...
  • has no friends, socially insecure, reticent, or aloof
  • Fidgety, inability to act properly, disorganization, poor concentration ...
  • Learning disorders, reading, spelling and arithmetic weaknesses ...

The sensory integration therapy

The treatment begins with a differentiated assessment of the findings. It includes questioning the parents and the child, observations and standardized test procedures.
This results in the finding that shows the strengths and weaknesses of the sensory processing and the motor response and which is repeatedly checked and differentiated in the course of the treatment. The sensorimotor findings can provide information about connections to the child's abnormalities (e.g. in gross and fine motor skills, ability to act, behavior ...).
Targeted active and passive sensory and motor activities initially improve sensory integration (neural integration). Building on this, further goals (e.g. improving the ability to act, self-organization, self-esteem, drive ...) can be achieved. The therapist is always in an interactive dialogue with the child and adapts the offers to the child's reactions accordingly. The therapist uses her special knowledge of the effect of the senses on one another and the complex relationships between perception, motor skills, action and behavior.
The therapy is structured in such a way that the targeted offers for sensory integration create the prerequisites for achieving "higher" goals (e.g. fine motor skills / pen holding, action planning, concentration). Building on this, these skills are specifically promoted.
The therapy has an effect in everyday life as the new impulses / what has been “learned” are implemented by the child at home and thus automatically practiced. (The child starts e.g. to climb, ride a scooter, paint, do puzzles ...). The caregivers are included accordingly and concrete assistance is worked out together.